Do you want to work with others to make an impact and change the world?

There’s no better opportunity to do it than through the U-M Problem Solving Initiative at Michigan Law School. This innovative program is committed to ideological diversity in approaches to problem solving and provides a platform for the development of creative solutions to some of the world’s most difficult challenges in business and society by giving students a framework for analyzing and solving complex problems and guiding organizations through innovation and change. Through a team-based, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning model, small groups of graduate and professional students work with top-notch faculty to explore and offer solutions to emerging, complex, multifaceted problems. The small group classes, comprising students from a wide variety of top-ranked U-M graduate and professional schools, give participants a unique opportunity to receive guidance from accomplished instructors and leading experts in the business and policy communities. The format is designed to allow students to represent the unique perspective of their academic discipline while working together with faculty and outside experts to propose a solution to some of the world’s most challenging problems.

These are not conventional graduate courses involving linear delivery of prepared content. The goal is for the students to develop solutions to big problems in the world. The instructors do not sit back hiding the answers. They don’t have the answers. Really. The professors are facilitators, conveners, project leaders, and (occasionally) experts, but students ultimately run the show.

Fall 2017 Courses

Connected and Autonomous Vehicle Technology: Business and Regulatory Issues

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Stable and Integrated Housing for America's Working Poor

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Economic Integration for Individuals in the Refugee Resettlement Program

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Identifying Victims of Human Trafficking within Health Care Settings

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What Challenges Does the PSI Address?

Classes address problems that are:

  • Complex and multi-layered, requiring an interdisciplinary approach to generate viable solutions;
  • Not easily solved with simple research and require students to develop a significant innovation;
  • Clearly defined and sufficiently narrow that students have an opportunity to develop potential solutions in a single semester

Have a Class Topic Idea?

Faculty and graduate and professional students from all U-M disciplines are encouraged to submit course proposals.

Proposals should include: (1) a proposed course title, (2) a brief description of the problem presented and potential class deliverable(s), (3) participating U-M schools and colleges and/or departments, (4) proposed instructors, and (5) the semester in which you would like the course offered.

Submit Course Proposals